Music Terms

If you're starting out on your musical journey, it can be like conquering a whole new language. However, do not panic - we have compiled a musician's glossary, which contains all the basic musical terms. Let's start deciphering! Without further ado, here are musical terms to expand your knowledge as an artist. This musical terminology will not only help you understand music, but will also help you communicate with other creative people.

  • Music Terms

    Ritardando, ritardando |

    Dictionary categories terms and concepts Italian, lit. – slowing down, delaying; abbr. rit. The designation used in musical notation for a smooth, gradual slowdown in tempo. The meaning coincides with the designation rallentando and approaches the designation ritenuto; opposes the terms accelerando and stringendo, which prescribe an acceleration of the tempo. Since the abbreviation R. (rit.) coincides with the abbreviation ritenuto, the performer, when deciphering it, has to conform to his muses. taste.

  • Music Terms

    Stuffed, рипиeно |

    Dictionary categories terms and concepts Italian, lit. – full; abbr. rip., in the 17th-18th centuries. also R. In orchestral music of the 17th-18th centuries. a term equivalent to tutti. The excerpts marked R. were to be performed by the entire orchestra and were opposed to solo excerpts – the concertino. In the same sense, the designation R. is used in the 20th century. in english music for the spirit. tools. R. were also called orc in the past. parts (for example, a group of violins), as well as parts that sounded only in tutti or generally served only to fill the muses. fabrics. Basso ripieno – in orchestra. music of…

  • Music Terms

    Rallentando, rallentando |

    Dictionary categories terms and concepts Italian, lit. – slowing down; abbreviations – rallent., ral. The designation used in musical notation for a smooth, gradual slowdown in tempo. The meaning coincides with the designation ritardando and approaches the designation ritenuto; opposes the notation of tempo acceleration – accelerando and stringendo.

  • Music Terms

    Presto, presto |

    Dictionary categories terms and concepts ital. – fast Fast tempo notation. Applied from the beginning 17th century Initially, there was little or no distinction between R. and allegro; only in the 18th century. R. has become the designation of a faster tempo compared to the allegro. In the 18th century the designation R. was usually combined with the size designation alla breve ( ); yet at the pace of R. remained longer than in allegro tempo. The difference between R. and allegro is also due to the fact that allegro, unlike R., originally served as an indication of the lively, cheerful nature of music. Designation “R.” often used in the…

  • Music Terms

    Prestissimo, prestissimo |

    Dictionary categories terms and concepts ital., superlative from presto – quickly Denoting a very fast tempo. It has been used in this sense along with the “composite” terms presto assai, presto molto since about the 30s. 17th century Usually used in closing. sections of the final parts of the sonata-symphony. cycles, less often – as a designation of the tempo of the whole movement.

  • Music Terms

    Portato, portato |

    Dictionary categories terms and concepts Italian, from portare – to carry, express, assert; French loure The method of performance is intermediate between legato and staccato: all sounds are performed with emphasis, at the same time separated from each other by small pauses of “breathing”. R. is indicated by a combination of dots staccato or (rarely) dashes with a league. On strings. On bowed instruments, rhymes are usually performed on a single bow movement. Gives the music features of declamation, special elation. One of the clearest examples of the use of rhythm is the slow part of the strings. Beethoven Quartet op. 131 (R. for all 4 instruments). R. was known…

  • Music Terms

    Portamento, portamento |

    Dictionary categories terms and concepts Italian, from portare la voce – to transfer the voice; French port de voix In playing bowed instruments, a way of playing a melody by slowly sliding a finger along a string from one position to another. Close to glissando; however, if the indication of glissando is given by the composer himself in the musical text, then the use of R., as a rule, is left to the discretion of the performer. R.’s use was determined primarily by the development of positional playing on the violin and the resulting need to achieve a smooth connection of sounds in the cantilena when moving from position to…

  • Music Terms

    Pizzicato, pizzicato |

    Dictionary categories terms and concepts Italian, from pizzicare – to pinch Reception of performance on strings. stringed instruments. It consists in the fact that the sound is extracted not by holding the bow, but by plucking the string with the finger of the right hand, as on a guitar, harp, and other strings. plucked instruments. The return to the former usual way of performance is indicated in the notes by the term arco (Italian, bow) or col arco (Italian, bow). R. can be performed both as separate sounds and double notes. On the violin and viola, the sounds extracted by R. are very dry and quickly fade out, they are…

  • Music Terms

    Piano, piano |

    Dictionary categories terms and concepts more precisely drunk, ital., lit. – quiet; abbreviation p One of the most important dynamic notation (see Dynamics). In meaning, it is the antipode to the designation forte. Along with Italian the term “R.” in German countries. language, the designation leise is sometimes used, in the countries of English. language – soft (abbr. so). In Russia in con. 17th century the term “quiet” was used in the same meaning (found in manuscripts of partes singing). In multi-choir music and in works of the “concert style,” the meaning of R. often acquired the designation echo (see Echo). The designations piano and forte were first used by…

  • Music Terms

    Opus, opus |

    Dictionary categories terms and concepts lat., lit. — work, creation, essay; blind — or. A term used to denote the order in which a composer creates compositions. As a rule, it is applied when they are published. In cases where the publication given composer began relatively late (F. Schubert), the O. sequence does not always correspond to the order in which works were created. Often, especially in the past, composers published under one O. several. op. one genre; while each Op. additionally received its own number “inside” O. (for example, L. Beethoven’s piano trio op. 1 No 1, op. 1 No 2 and op. 1 No 3, etc.). When publishing…